A Review of Direwild (A Cooperative Deckbuilder)

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Box Art!

Direwild was a Kickstarter from November, 2017.  It’s a cooperative deckbuilding game for 1-4 players.  I didn’t pick up the Kickstarter, but rather my FLGS .. and I still got the Kickstarter version (with miniatures).  I’ll be honest, I loved the art on the cover and what I saw!!  Between that, Kickstarter minis, AND it’s cooperative?  I picked it up!

Components

The components are pretty great.  The Kickstarter minis are real nice and add a lot of flavor.

The boards and character sheets are very colorful and full of the same art that drew me in.  Oh look!  Character sheets with variable player powers!  One of my favorite mechanisms!

The board sets the stage for how good this looks on the table.  I just love the art and the way things are organized.

The little boxes comes with separate components/cards FOR EACH CHARACTER!  Each character has it’s own unique stuff!  So very cool!

The components, for me, are just really amazing.

The Rulebooks

The rulebook is kind of divided into two books: Intro and Set-up, then Gameplay.

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Book 1: Intro and Set-up
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Book 2: Gameplay

For the most part this worked, as the set-up and intro aren’t something you need a lot.  I found that we referenced the Intro book a lot more than we expected (to look up certain effects and Icons like poison and pushback, see below).   It feels like those effects should have been described in the Gameplay book, but it’s a minor point (see below).

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Discussions of effects and Icons like Poison and Pushback are in the Intro, when they probably should have been in the Gameplay book.

Set-Up

The rulebook has a VERY good section on setting up, with a list of all components …

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List of all Components!  And pictures!

And pictures on how to set-up!

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Picture of how to set-up!

It was very easy to get the game set-up.  I was very pleased with how well the set-up book looked.  This was one of the better rulebooks for that I’ve seen in a while.

So, I got a game set-up pretty quickly!

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Direwild all set-up and ready to play!

 

Solo Play

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Grrr … no solo play …

So does this game adhere to Saunders’ Law: A cooperative game should have a viable solo mode?  Nope!  The box CLEARLY says  only 2-4 players.  Well, sometimes a game will say it doesn’t have a solo mode, but has an “ad-hoc” variant listed in the rules.  Nope!  Not Direwild!

A standard trick is to simply have the solo player play two positions.  This game could have easily said that, but I didn’t see that anywhere.  So, STRICTLY SPEAKING, this game doesn’t have solo rules!  (And this game has a lot of rules—I can see why it would very intimidating to use 2 characters in your first solo game).

Many of you who read my blog know that I tend to come up with solo rules for cooperative games that don’t have any.  So I do below.    And why do I do this?  So I can play the game, get a sense of the mechanics so I can teach my friends!  AND if the game is great, I can play it by myself as well!

I don’t get why this game doesn’t have solo rules.  Either use my solo rules below or have a solo player take control of two characters!

A Preliminary Set of Solo Rules

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Direwild all set-up and ready to play!

The picture above depicts a solo game set-up.  I have some simple tweaks to make the game solo: I am not 100% happy with them, but they are good enough to get you into the game so you can learn most of the rules.

Honestly, these tweaks are mostly just linear extrapolations of the rules that are already there.
In a solo game:

First, during set-up: anything that says set-up XXX per player , just follow those rules!  For example, the locks are two per player (so use 2) and the Karn regenerates Cards are one per player (so just use 1).

  1. (Step 4 of set-up) Populate the wilds with 7 cards.  This causes one card to be off the board.

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    Linearly extrapolate: 1 Player has 7 Wilds slots!
  2. There is only 1 Minion per board (as there is one Minion per player).  When you set up for Step 11, You’ll use a 1 Level 1 Minion, 1 Level 2 Minion, and 1 Level 3 Minion.

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    A 1 Player game only has 3 Minion cards! A level 1 Minion, A level 2 Minion and a Level 3 Minion! That’s it!
  3. I would also give the solo player 3-5 treasures to start the game.

And that’s pretty much the extent of the changes, and those are only to set-up! You play normally from there.

The reason these rules are “preliminary” is because I feel they need more testing, but they do get you into a solo game quickly, only operating 1 character.  Honestly, I died pretty quickly in the second round of the campaign, which is probably why you need two characters (who can watch each others back).  BUT this can get you far enough to learn the game.

Deckbuilding

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basic intro cards

So, this is a deck-builder game.  Every character starts with some very simply cards (puppies and kittens) and has to use “charm” (the yellow hexagon) to buy more cards.  It’s a deckbuilder!  You buy cards from a tableau (called the Wilds).

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Basic cards PLUS character specific starting cards

Each character starts with two special “character specific” cards that only they have.

Kittens have charm and can help buy more cards.  Puppies have attack which you can use to fight the Minions.  You buy better and better cards with more attack and more charm.  It’s a deck-builder!

Attack

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Lead animal

When you are ready to Attack a Minion (you have to kill Minions on the board to advance to the next level), you choose a lead animal and then FLIP all your other animals to be support!  The BAT (above) becomes the lead card and ALL OTHER animals help support for more attack, move, or other effects.  Plus, now you can say you have a “Feisty, Furry, Wild, Scythed Bat!”  (The BAT above gets his normal 3 Attack, and another 3 from his supporting animals, plus an extra move).

This mechanic was really innovative and fun.  We enjoyed this idea quite a bit in the beginning.

High-Level Overview

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Mid game

You move around the board, hiding behind walls, trying to avoid or engage the minion, and look for treasure.  Every turn, you can get better cards for a better deck, but Karn (the big bad) gets closer and closer to coming out … you can advance to the next scenario (there are 3) if you kill all the Minions.  If kill Karn at any point, you just win!

So, along with the deck-building, there is some movement and attempts at strategy on the board.

Solo Play Experience

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A losing 1-player game

So, I played the game solo a few times and was happy to get around.  I liked that you could save the game between sessions.  But I got stuck in Scenario 2: I couldn’t damage the Minion (because of his special ability) and I couldn’t get around it.  So I just died.  It was very frustrating to not be able to do anything.  I  chalked it up to “I was using my solo rules, so they obviously weren’t balanced”.

I had an okay time playing solo, but I was frustrated.

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I couldn’t get Lohri to have negative Stamina, so I just lost!

Multiplayer Game

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Oof.  This is hard to talk about.  At first, my friends LOVED the game!  Puppies and Kittens!  The art and graphic design were amazing!  But we played some games, and the word of the day was “frustrating“.   Teresa was frustrated because she felt she could never fight (she couldn’t seem to get a good deck doing).  Sara was frustrated because she could never disengage after getting ganged-up on by the Minions.  Andrew was frustrated because he never felt he had a choice.  We were all frustrated because we never really could cull our decks.  (We finally, after 4 games, found the Monkey, but is that the ONLY way to cull your deck????)

Teresa was having fun reading the little quotes on the cards and loving the art, but she stopped having fun when Sara just so frustrated it was papable.  Part of her frustation was her power was very random and it never worked for her.  (In fact, the only one who seemed to have a good power was the “Tank”).   The powers, which are supposed to differentiate the players, seemed unbalanced and not fun.

The game was frustrating.  My play group DID NOT have fun.  In fact, two of the players gave the game a 3/10 (and it only gets a 3 because the art is so good).

Balance and House Rules

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The game simply feels a little too lucky and a little unbalanced.  The main frustration was that people felt like they couldn’t do anything.  So, here’s some house  rules we came up that MIGHT help the game!

  1. Players should win ties.  Monsters win ties, and we got screwed over and over again because of that.
  2. Allow a single card cull per turn.  A player uses charm to “unbuy” a card for it’s charm amount (+1).   This would allow this to feel much more like a deck-builder.  Maybe Wounds would 3 or 4 Charm to “unbuy”?
  3. Use the 1-4 tokens for targetting, but just let the characters go and buy/attack in any order they want!    We felt this would increase the feel of cooperation as all characters would be looking at the Wilds at the same time and making decisions TOGETHER as to what to buy!  The “choose 1-4” order just seemed to serialize it too much (“Oh, it’s my turn.”)
  4. A few clarifications.  Monsters can only attack 1 person?  As we read the rules, it feels like the monsters can attack everyone that attacks it in the same round!  This seemed unbalancing and also not realistic.    We were thinking, maybe, it can only attack the first person?  Unless it has a special ability?  It seemed very unbalancing.
  5. Easier to disengage? You had to take a fatal wound to disengage.  This seemed too hard?
  6. Rebalance the Powers: Sara hated the random power she had. (Pick a type of card: if you draw it, you get +1! If not, take a wound!)

House Rules 4-6 would probably need a lot of playtest to validate/invalidate them, but Rules 1-3 seem important and doable.  The lack of culling (except for the Monkey?) seemed especially out of place in the game.

Conclusion

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The quote of the night:

The only thing fun about this game is complaining how unfun it was!

My playgroup DID NOT like this game at all.  I thought it was “ok” for solo, but it still feels unbalanced.  We all loved the components and artwork!! BUT the game feels very unbalanced and too lucky,  We think that MAYBE, MAYBE, with house rules (described previously), this might be a significantly better game. As it is, none of my game group really ever wants to play this again.  I wouldn’t mind playing it solo.

The components are amazing. I wish the game were better.  There’s a great game hiding in here!  There are some unique mechanics and ideas, but the balance seems off.

 

 

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A Defense of Keeping Punchout Skeletons

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Punchout Skeletons from the game Sidekick Saga

What do you do with the punchout skeletons from your board games?  A punchout skeleton is the leftover cardboard outline (see above) not used in the game.

“I throw them away.  Why are we still talking about this?”

Most people throw them away.  I don’t.

You Keep The Punchout Skeletons?

This particular post is motivated by a few things.   The first motive is a story by my friend’s father.

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Punchout skeletons for Nemo Rising

According to my friends Alison and Charlie: every time their Dad opens a new game, he punches it out.  He then looks at the punchout skeletons, laughs to himself and says “Oh Richie”. Then he just throws the punchout skeletons away!!!

I am Richie:  Yes, to be clear, Alison and Charlie’s Dad is laughing at me.  Because I keep the Skeleton Punchouts.

So I offer a four pronged defense of why I keep the skeletons.

Reason 1: You might need something you didn’t punch out!

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Plastic Insert for Sidekick Saga

This reason was motivated by a conversation I recently had with my manufacturer.  My manufacturer was trying to fit all the pieces of Sidekick Saga into a plastic insert/tray.   (see above) They asked:

“Do you need the blank tokens to fit in the tray as well?”

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YES!  Absolutely!  Sidekick Saga has a “Build-Your-Own-SuperHero” mechanic where you need some SOI tokens (blank square tokens on right) and Character Standees (bottom-most blank tokens).  Players can draw, print, glue or whatever works on these blank tokens.

THE MANUFACTURER THOUGHT SIDEKICK SAGA DID NOT NEED THE BLANK TOKENS!!  YOU ABSOLUTELY DO!

I have been chatting with the manufacturer for months, and they know the game really well.   But it didn’t register until they asked about them.

If you threw away the skeletons, you might have also thrown away the blank tokens …

Keeping the skeletons keeps you in the mindset of keeping all components (and not accidentally throwing anything away).

Reason 2: Double-Check for Components

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Nemo Rising: A newish cooperative game

I was recently unboxing and setting up a relatively new cooperative game called Nemo Rising. (This is a cooperative games blog after all).  During set-up, a question came up about the components.

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Components List from Nemo

I felt like I was missing something!! (This Rulebook could have used a picture of components …)

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Punchout skeletons for Nemo Rising

So, I went back and double-checked what I punched-out versus what was in the Components List.  It turns out a few  tokens were “hidden” somewhere on the table, but matching the punchouts skeletons to the components allowed me to “double-check” the component list with the actual components.

A side-effect of the “Double-Check” rationale is you can ALWAYS see if you have all the components of your game!!  Have you lost any components?  Did you buy a used game and want to verify the components?  If the punchout skeletons are included with the game, you can double-check the components!

Reason 3: Keep Rulebooks Flat

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Box for Battle for Greyport

I reviewed Battle for Greyport some time ago.   It’s a smallish box with a lot of components.  But the Rulebook lays awkwardly in the box.

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Rulebook hangs weirdly in the box!

If you look closely, you’ll see the rulebook is “kinda” supported by a few deck dividers.  And there’s a lot of empty space on the bottom left of the box, so the rulebook “droops” in that part of the box.  If only there was a way to keep the Rulebook flat!!!!!

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Punchout skeletons to the rescue!

The punchout skeletons can support the Rulebook (like a rulebook bra?) so that the Rulebook stays flat (in the box) and doesn’t bend weirdly.

This, to me, is the best reason to keep punchout skeletons: I like to keep my games in good shape, and keeping the Rulebook flat keeps it in good shape!!  (One of my pet peeves are Rulebooks that don’t lay flat!!   It’s hard to learn a game if you can’t put the Rulebook down FLAT on the table!! )

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A related benefit (if you have multiple punchout skeletons)  is that you can separate content.  For example, the Kickstarter version of Battle for Greyport came with content for The Red Dragon Inn (see above).    I can keep that content sandwiched between the skeletons to keep it separate from the main game.

Reason 4: Completionist

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Punchout Board for Detective: City of Angels

At the end of the day, I like to have everything that came with the board game.  I am a completionist.

If I need to ever sell a game, I can honestly say I am giving a buyer everything that came with the game!  I can show a buyer that I have all the pieces (because I can double-check components).  I can show a buyer that I care enough about my games to keep everything in good shape!  This gives a buyer confidence that my games are in good shape.

In Detective: City of Angels, it makes sense to keep the punchout skeleton because the game actually encourages you to put the people tokens BACK IN THE PUNCHOUT!! It shows  that you have a complete set of people!!!  Detective: City of Angels is a game that I could easily see selling because it has a limited number of cases: you can only play it so many times.   Keeping the punchout skeletons keeps the game together and complete so I could sell it more easily.

Conclusion

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Using punchout skeletons to separate content

At the end of the day, I realize it does seem a little crazy to keep the punchboard skeletons.   I think Alison and Charlie’s Dad thinks I am especially crazy.  I hope I have convinced you that there are good reasons to keep your punchout skeletons. No?

Well, If you don’t want your punchout skeletons, can I have them?

 

Review of Detective: City of Angels (Cooperative Mode)

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Detective: City of Angels Box Lid

To be clear: this is a review of Detective: City of Angels by Van Ryder Games (see picture above) and NOT Detective by Portal Games.

I was one of the Kickstarter backers for Detective: City of Angels.  And this games was very late: so late that it made Zee Garcia’s “Most Anticipated Games” twice: once in 2018 and once in 2019.  It was supposed to deliver in Sept. 2018, and it delivered in August 2019.

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This game sat on my shelf for almost a month after I got it.  Every time I went to play it, I noticed “Oh, it’s a one vs. many or one vs. competitive.  Why did I get this?”   Until one day I opened the rules and reminded myself why I got it:

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The Three ways to play Detective: City of Angels.

Oh ya! There is a cooperative mode.  Most others reviews will focus on the Classic Mode or Head-to-Head Mode.  Nope.  We will only focus on this as a cooperative game.  (This is a cooperative games blog after all).

Unboxing

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Wow! What great art when you open the box!

When I first opened the box, I was blown away by the art on all the little character standees!  So colorful!  And the case boxes on the side were really cool!

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More Tokens

There are a lot of tokens: it turns out, you don’t use nearly as many for the cooperative game (you don’t use Snitch or money or A-L).  The Stress markers (upper right) and Final Guess are ONLY used in the cooperative game.

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Case Sheets (notes for solving)

This is definitely a deduction game with mystery aspects! Players will be filing out a case sheet … well, only one shared case sheet for the entire cooperative team (although we still each took our own notes separately when we played).  The Case Sheet is how you keep track of information you have uncovered.

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What a BIG Board!

The Board is HUGE and barely fits on my table.  In fact, when we played, all 4 players came to the front side or the edges of the table, while the board draped over the edge!  This board is huge!  And really cool …

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Case book: briefing

Each player gets a briefing book  …although technically, you could all probably share one in the cooperative game.  It makes it nice to follow along.

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This is the most important book in the cooperative game: players read sections of very thematic text out of this to gather information.

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Sections of the sleuth book to read!

The cards (and these are ONLY USED IN THE COOPERATIVE GAME) give the number of the section to read from the casebook when you are ready to investigate “something”.

The Chisel and Classic Mode Components

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There are a LOT of components (see below) related to the Chisel and the competitive mode.  You don’t need those components for cooperative play (although you WILL use the chisel book above to look at the final answer).  In competitive mode, the Chisel is sort of like a Dungeon Master (DM), running the adventure and reading thematic text and passages.  In the cooperative game, the reading is shared among the players, and rotates every turn  … there is no DM: the players are playing against the game.

There are a lot of tokens not used in competitive mode:

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Cooperative mode uses the hats, cubes, and miniatures, but not the other tokens.

The Rulebook

 

The rulebook is very colorful and very good.  The only problem is that the rulebook is geared towards Classic Mode (competitive mode) and the cooperative mode is discussed only after all the Classic Mode  are discussed (and a lot of those rules aren’t even relevant).

So, I struggled A LITTLE with the rules.  But, the Sleuth Mode did have its own section (and a pretty big section) for the cooperative play.  It even showed a set-up picture for JUST the cooperative play!

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I wish the game had been geared towards cooperative play (Sleuth Mode) rather than competitive play (Classic Mode), but I was able to get to the cooperative mode fairly quickly.

Gameplay

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Cooperative Mode Components
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A Solo Player game

The game plays by each character having 4 actions (represented by the 4 cubes).   Each player gets a chance to perform his 4 actions and play rotates around the board. After you perform your actions (move, search suspect or location, question), the day counter (on far right of board) moves down.  If it makes it to Day 1 (or the Final guess token, which moves up when you get too much stress), then you need to solve the WHO DUNNIT, HOW DO IT, and WHY DO IT  (suspect, weapon, motive).   If you fail, then you can go into overtime and take a few more turns.  And you solve the case or you don’t!

The active player performs his actions, while the player to his left consults the Sleuth Cards (for what happens when he searches, or questions), and the player to his right reads from the Sleuth book, describing “What happened.”

The game plays a LOT like Agents of SMERSH or Tales of the Arabian Nights: The game is story driven with a lot of reading.  However, there is also a lot of thematic air as well! You don’t just read: players get to make a choice!  After the text is is read, you may challenge it!  You may think the suspect is lying and shake them up!  Sometimes, you get new info (“I knew they were lying!”) … and sometimes you cause STRESS (“I told you I wasn’t lying!!!  I’m calling the cops!”)  If you cause TOO MUCH STRESS, then you shorten the game (make the final guess marker move up).

I thought it was very thematic to be able to “rough up” your suspects.

Solo Play

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Solo Game set up with the first Scenario

So this games works great as a solo mode.  The solo mode is essentially the cooperative mode, but with only 1 detective.  So congratulations to Detective: City of Angels  on following Saunders’ Law: All cooperative games need a viable solo mode.

I played solo, I learned the game, I had fun … even though I did lose.  I worried about story-telling part: usually reading lots of text for a solo player doesn’t work well for me (like in Robit Riddle or Crusoe Crew), but because I had a choice to “challenge” the response after reading, I felt like I had more choice!  It kept me engaged.

This game worked well as a solo game.

Multiple Players

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The game worked very well with multiple players!  Even though there’s only one active player, someone is always doing something!  One player is active taking their turn, one player is consulting the Sleuth card (to figure where to read in the Sleuth book), and one player is reading the Sleuth book!   Even in a 4 player game, the 4th player can be taking notes on the case cards!

 

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Everyone is active!  And then the mystery itself was interesting!

The Cases

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To be clear, this is a game of deduction and solving a mystery (I’ve only seen murder so far).  This isn’t Clue or Awkward Guests where you eliminate things with precision (“Oh here’s a card: cross off the jealousy icon”).  You have to listen to the WAY certain suspects answer the questions, you have to look at the evidence carefully, and you have to understand something of human nature.   If you want a mystery that solved precisely and methodically like Clue, this may not be for you.    You really have to put the pieces together by understanding human nature as well as the evidence!

There are certainly elements of deduction that are very important, but I felt like really finding the final solution required looking below the surface.

Conclusion

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At the end of the day, this is a fantastic game.  I liked it as a solo game and my friends and I all enjoyed this as a cooperative mystery.  (It came up several times: we like this MUCH MORE than the Portal Games Detective! My group did not like the Portal game, as it felt too much like work).   We all had FUN!

Detective: City of Angels plays a lot like Agents of SMERSH and Tales of Arabian Nights. There’s a lot of story, and players read from the storybook.  But there’s a mystery to unlock!  That’s both boon and bane!  That same mystery that makes Detective: City of Angels so much more thematic and engaging than Agents of SMERSH and Tales of Arabian Nights also limits Detective: City of Angels’ replayability.  There’s only 9 Cases that come in the core box!  And once you have played them, you are really done with them (unless you come back years later).  Luckily, there is one expansion already done and another expansion on Kickstarter as we speak!

At the end of the day, I would probably give this an 8 on the BoardGameGeek scale.  Fun game.

 

 

Review of The Forests of Adrimon (Hexplore It!)

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HexPlore It! The Cover for The Forests of Adrimon

The Forests of Adrimon is the second in a series of three HexPlore It games.  The third just recently funded on Kickstarter, and I think the second one (The Forests) just came into retail distribution.  I knew it was a Kickstarter, but I picked it up from a retail store.

Fantasy Cooperative Game

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Basic Set-Up

So, TFOA (The Forests of Adrimon) is a cooperative game for 1-6 players.  It’s an exploration game (within a forest) in a fantasy universe.   It’s probably called HexPlore It because the world is made of … wait for it … hexes.

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The Floromancer Character Role

Each player in the game takes on the role a single hero in the game: you choose both a Race (see below) and a Role Mat/Profession (see above).

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Races

The Heroes all work and move together around the hex map, trying to level up to beat … the big Bad Boss … Adrimon!

First Play: Solo Experience

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So, my first play was a solo adventure.  They adhere to Saunders’ Law and have a very viable solo experience.   Set-up took a while: there are A LOT of components.

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Here’s the thing: I HATED my first play.  I lost within a few rounds, even after I “cheated” a few times to stay in the game.  I HAD to be doing something wrong!  I felt like I had no chance to level up, and the Dice just work against me!

And I was doing something wrong:  so here’s a public service message if you play the game:

You can use gold to update your Abilities and Skills and Health and Hit Points. 

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Skills! The first update costs 3, then 4, then 5 … around the rim of the skills!

I missed this rule in the first playthrough (which is clearly on page 13 of the rulebook), and didn’t think I had a chance.  Once you know you can spend gold to update these, you realize how precious and important gold is!!

10-Sided Dice Rolls

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10-sided dice for Navigate, Explore, Survive

At the beginning of every turn, each player rolls 3 10-sided dice for Navigate (green), Explore (yellow), Survival (blue).  If you fail (roll over your skill value), there are consequences (get lost, no gold, lose food).  In the beginning of the game, your stats are very low and you are just barely surviving!!!  So, you find yourself barely getting by.

Public Service Announcement: spend your gold to up you Explore ASAP:  this makes it more likely to get 2 gold per turn, which you can use to up your other stats!

Second Playthrough: 2-Player Game

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Our second game went MUCH BETTER once we realized that we could use our gold to up our stats.

The game, in broad terms, seemed to play out like this:

  1. In the first half of the game, we explored and found Relics (special items needed to beat the big Bad at the end).   We tended to avoid combat, and in fact our first combat was halfway through the game!
  2. In the second half of the game, we embraced combat and fought a few more things.  We also ended up spending a lot of time in the cities trying to up more of our stats, getting ready for the final combat (and trying to get more Relics).
  3. The final combat was pretty intense: almost a half hour and we should have died, but we won!

We had fun, but there are a lot of things that were … suboptimal.

Dry-Erase Markers and Mats

Each player in the game uses a mat which works with a dry-erase marker.

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Dry-erase markers

So, because 8 (?) role mats were dry-erase, almost ALL mats in the game were dry-erase, even though they didn’t need to be!  There were 10 mats for a lot of BIG BAD villains, and they were dry-erase, there were Location mats, Game Turn Mats, Sentinel Mats, .. 18 total!  And frankly, the only ones that “really needed” dry-erase were the character mats (as you constantly updated stats, and erased and drew).

“Why is this a big deal?  The dry-erase of the other mats didn’t get in the way did it?”

No, but here’s the thing, the dry-erase didn’t quite work in the game.  Here’s why:

  1. The dry-erase markers in the game were TOO FAT!  They SHOULD HAVE BEEN ultra-fine dry-erase markers!
  2. The area (for the backpack) for writing equipment was too tiny and didn’t work for keeping track of your stuff!

Take a look at your mat:

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A Character

Now, take a look at the “backpack” area:  it’s a small 2 inch by 2 inch area where you have to write TONS of stuff, with a fat marker!

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Backpack

Can you read that? I can’t and I wrote it!

Suggestions for the Mats

There are 3 suggestions to fix this:

  1. Get rid of the dry-erase mechanism altogether and use pencil and paper
  2. Use ultra-fine markers and make the backpack area a little bigger
  3. Use the back of the unused characters as your backpack instead of trying to fit your backpack in a smaller area.

The back of the character mats is pretty cool: they have pictures:

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The backs of the character mats

These pictures are REALLY COOL!  But I don’t think I EVER looked at the picture in the entire game!!   BUT, if you just had a “blank” tableau on the back, then the characters could use two mats to play: one for the character, and one for the backpack!  You might even be able to keep the fat markers!

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Use two mats! One for the normal character stats (left), and the back of an unused character (right) for a backpack! Here, the back of an unused character is a cool but never seen picture!

It’s weird that SO MANY MATS are in the game, and only the character mats (and Battle mat) need to be dry-erase; it seems a waste that the other 11 are dry-erase.   All we could figure out was that they did that for manufacturing: it was cheaper to make ALL 18 mats dry-erase.

The dry-erase works “ok” for the stats, but it doesn’t really work for the equipment.

Time To Play

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The back of the box says that the gametime 60-180+.  Um, it took us EIGHT HOURS!  After the first FOUR HOURS, we set the game aside (see above) so we could come back to it later.    The second play took ANOTHER FOUR HOURS!!

Granted, it was only the second game, but I feel like I had most of the rules by that point, so maybe an hour of that would be “learning stuff”.

Be aware, if you play the game and get to the end, it may take you 6-8 hours.  We joked that it was only 60-180 minutes if you died early.

The Rulebook

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The rulebook

There were a lot of problems with the rulebook.

  1. Black background, white text.  This is a personal pet peeve of mine: it’s almost always harder to read!! But, people like to do it because it looks more “thematic” (Oh, this is a dark game).
  2. It’s too small.  This is a big game and the rulebook seems “too small”.  A lot of rules which would belong together on a page span multiple pages and make it harder to read.  For example, combat takes almost 28 pages to describe!  It was very frustrating to read about combat as you paged through the book!
  3. The rulebook won’t stay open.  If I wanted to keep the rulebook open, I had to “hold it” open!  I am used to board game rulebooks that just stay open when you put them on the table.  The binding of the rulebook forced you to hold it open to see things!
  4. The text was too close to the binding.  In other words, I had to “force” the book open to see all the text that was close to the binding.
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Black background, white text!  Have to hold rulebook open! Text too close to binding! 

The rulebook itself did describe most of the rules.  But, a lot of rules were also on dry-erase boards.    IMG_4584(1)

For example, a lot of stuff for the Waypost is on this dry-erase board (above).  Similarly, rules for Sentinels, the Battle Sites, the Enthralled Cities, and Elowen’s Grove were on other dry-erase boards.    We got used to it when we played, but it was non-intuitive that the rules were so spread out.

After we played, I was used to having the rules spread over multiple boards and in fact, I think I liked it: we weren’t “so tied” to the rulebook.   But, I think I wanted more in the rulebook.

Summary Overall

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In the end, my friend and I had a good time playing the game, in spite of the everything.   It felt fairly balanced.   We did “game the game” a little by spending way too much time in the Enthralled Cities.   We were surprised that Combat wasn’t more upfront (that could have just been the way we played).

We felt like there were too many rules for what it was.  The rulebook (grumble) was constantly held open as we had to look up stuff.

We played it, we won, but we don’t think we have a desire to play it again! It almost felt like a story/legacy game: once you’ve played it all the way through, you are done because you know what to expect!

Conclusion and Score

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A Winning game!

I’d probably give the components a 5-7/10 (it would be 8 or better but the dry-erase system didn’t work that well).  The pictures were awesome and thematic, and I felt like I was in a forest with the hexes.

The rulebook was a 6/10: it should be less, but because it actually taught the game, I have to give it at least a 6.

The gameplay was fun ONCE WE GOT INTO IT:   7/10 for gameplay.

The game was too long and doesn’t have a lot of replayability.   BUT I plan to give the game to some friends and have them play.  If you look at this game as a legacy game with a 6-8 hour playtime AND YOU KNOW THAT’S WHAT YOU ARE GETTING, then this game would be a lot more fun.

I am really conflicted on what to give this game as an “overall”: When we played it, we had fun, but that was despite the issues.    If you know what you are getting into, I think this could be a good game.

 

 

 

Review of Set A Watch

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The Deluxe Kickstarter slip cover

Set A Watch is a Kickstarter game that was active in late September 2018 and delivered here to the USA in late June/early July.   It’s a cooperative game about keeping watch at a campfire and defeating monsters who would attack your campfire.

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Set A Watch: a cooperative fighting game: protect the campfire!

Set A Watch is light to medium weight game for 1-4 players (although, see below).   Each player takes a very different role (Cleric, Knight, Beastmaster, etc): there are 8 roles in the game (6 or 7 in the retail version I think), with each player taking a different role.  It’s a smallish game in a smallish box (barely fitting in the box, but it does fit).

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Barely fits in box!

Note that the “board” is in the top of the box!  It’s pretty cool, but I had some trouble keeping the edge (leftmost edge in picture) down during play.

Characters

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Beast Master uses 8-sided dice!

Each player chooses a character, with 5 special abilities (only 3 at a time can be used in the empty positions on the card).  Each player also has a special ability back at camp (Set Trap above).

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Cleric uses 6-sided dice!

Each character gets 3 dice which you role at the start of your turn.  Some characters get 6-sided dice and some get 8-sided dice.  It’s pretty obvious: the 6-sideds are red/orange/yellow, and the 8-sideds are green/blue/purple.

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I wish the 8-sided dice used white for the colors so they were easier to see

The dice are the key element to the game!  Whenever you do anything, you assign dice to either abilities or just use the straight-up value to fight monsters with the direct value! Although it seems like the 8-sided heroes have an advantage, as they will tend to roll more potential damage, the 6-sided heroes have abilites that don’t depend as strongly on the value.  We’ll see more below …

Components

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The components are really nice.  The box has a magnetic clasp (ooooh!), the rulebook is pretty good, the cards have nice art, the dice are decent (although the 8-sided are harder to read), and in general the game looks really nice.

You even get some nice wooden bits: there are 3 different fire tokens to represent “how high the fire is”!  The higher the fire, the more of the creatures you can see!  Usually, a higher fire is a good thing!  The other wooden bits are a token to show “how many times you watched the fire”.   Everybody has to watch the fire twice before the big battle at the end ….

Solo Play??

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You must ALWAYS have 4 characters out, no matter the player count!

So, in Set A Watch, you must ALWAYS have 4 characters in play, regardless of the the player count.   This means that in a solo game, the solo character MUST PLAY 4 characters at a time!  Oi!! Although this game, strictly speaking, follows Saunders’ Law (every cooperative game must have a viable solo mode), it’s a bit much for the first play!! Playing 4 characters for a game you DON’T KNOW is really intimidating!!   I really wish this game had a balancing act for fewer players (like changing the number of monsters that come out depending on the number of players), but it is what it is.

Set-Up

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Each player takes a Character and the corresponding dice.  HINT!!!  The back of the character cards is a player summary card!!! Since there are 8 characters and only 4 ever playing, make sure you give everyone a “unplayed character” to use as a reference card!!!   And this makes me very happy: in all the games I played, the player summary card was worth its weight in gold!!  People who hadn’t played got almost everything they needed from either the player summary part of the front part of their card.

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The Warrior!

Once you choose your character, you choose 3 of your 5 powers to populate your character.  The other two remain dormant (although you can swap them in during the campfire phase later).  These 3 power cards represent your “hit points”: if all three of them are ever disabled, you cannot participate in combat.  You can heal from the Cleric, or back at the campfire.

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Set-up!

The Rulebook has a nice picture of set-up, although the “Line” (where all creatures come out) is impractical.  This is what I ended up doing, putting the line below the board …

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Initial Set-Up

Once you get the game set-up, it flows pretty quickly.  It’s a little fiddly to set-up.  There’s spaces for the Horde and Unused Locations in the box …

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Unused Locations and The Hoarde in the box!

But everything else is the sides (the Graveyard and the Unhallowed).  The difficulty of the game is controlled by how many Summon cards in the creature deck.  The more there are, the harder the game is! The Summon cards bring in the Unhallowed, which are nastier monsters!

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Gameplay

To Win, the players have to travel all the way back home (The Fobidden Tower).  There are 8 locations to move from, and when they get home, they have to do a final stand to defend their home (from the Hoard as well!).

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Home!

The gameplay is simple: at the start of the turn, everyone rolls their dice, and a decision is made!  One character watches the campfire for the night and the other 3 go and fight the monsters that would attack the campfire!  If any monsters make it through (aren’t defeated) , the adventurers gets wounded, and the remnants go the Horde.

Everyone must stay back (at the campfire) twice, but in the final combat at the Forbidden Tower, EVERYONE FIGHTS!

Campfire Phase

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The character decides to check the map and use his double to get rid of monster in the Horde!

Everyone looks at their dice to decide who stay back at the Campfire this turn.   Everyone must stay back exactly twice.  Whoever stays back decides what to do with their dice: they can heal, chop firewood, check the map, scout ahead.  If they roll doubles they can “activate Runes!” (do very special stuff )!  If you roll doubles, this might be a reason to have your character stay back this turn!  Again, the character summary sheet lets you know everything you can do!

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In our case, the player uses his doubles to VANQUISH and get rid of one monster from the Horde!  Important safety tip, you MUST FIGHT all monsters in the Horde when you make it back home!  So, it’s important to keep the Horde under control …

So, the guy back at camp just hangs out while his compatriots go fight!

Watch Phase

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Each character, in Player Selected Turn Order (PSTO) (i.e., any order they want) can play any amount of dice they want.  I can play 2, you can play 1, then I can play 1 more, etc.

You can use Dice directly as their value for damage against a monster.  The monster’s health is in the upper right corner.

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For example: if I have a 7 or 8, I can kill the Bandit with 1 die!  Since this is a cooperative game, I can play a 3 and you can play a 4 (or more) and together we can take it out!  Once a die is used, that’s it for that die this turn.

The second thing you can do it to use your die to activate one of your special abilities!

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Use dice to activate special powers!

For example: the Wizard has used two of his abilities this turn (each ability can only be activated once).  This is notated by putting one of the dice on the ability.

Finally, you can “exhaust” one of your abilities to use it again (without needing a die).  Unfortunately, unless you heal yourself, that ability is gone for the rest of the game.  (You can heal yourself back at camp or the Cleric can heal you).

Once all the monsters in the line are taken care of, you go to the next round!  There’s a notion of keeping your firewood high enough to see more monsters, and there’s some other rules, but that’s the basic game.

Thoughts

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A winning game!

So, this game has gone over like gangbusters in all my game groups.  I have played it solo, we have played it in my serious groups, a couple of lighter groups, and my Las Cruces group (which is notorious for very different opinions on games than my other groups).  And everyone has liked it!

The game plays quickly (an hour), everyone feels engaged most of the time, and bad dice rolls can be mitigated by the special powers!  I was worried that when a player “stayed back at camp”, that would cause that player to get annoyed for that turn (they are doing stuff, but not quite as much as the other players).  In the end, everyone “got it”!  Someone has to stay back and take it for the team this round!  And it seemed a very cooperative decision … since everyone has to stay back exactly twice, I don’t think anyone felt slighted.

The solo play works once you know the game, but always playing 4 characters is annoying.  I wish there were a better solo mode, this one is good enough to have fun with.

In the end, this game has been a hit in all my game groups.  It’s smallish, fast, fun, easy to learn, and there’s a ton of variety between the different characters.  This gets an 8 on the BoardGameGeek scale!  Good  game!

 

 

 

Review of Thunderstone Quest: The Barricades Expansion (the cooperative expansion) – Part II. The Conclusion.

This is part II of the Thunderstone Quest: the Barricades Expansion review:  See Part I here.   Part I focuses much more on components and overall initial experience.

Dungeon Crawling and Cooperative Deck-Building

The other night, we played two dungeon-crawling cooperative deckbuilder games back-to-back: Heroes of Tenefyr ….

… and Thunderstone Quest: The Barricades Expansion.

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The Expansion we will refer to as Barricades mode, just like the rulebook shows you …

Never have two games that were so similar been polar opposites!

Set-Up

Heroes of Tenefyr (HOT) took a few minutes to set-up.  Thunderstone Quest: The Barricades expansion (TQBE) took almost a half an hour.    And this is pretty typical.  I’ve played TQBE a number of times now and it takes a while to set it up.   You could argue that I am not familiar enough with the game to move it quicker, and you’d be right.

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But, for a game that’s almost as big as Gloomhaven, it just takes a while to set-up.  You just have to accept it!

Rules

I was able to explain the rules to HOT pretty quickly and we got underway.

TQBE took a while to ease into the rules: I had to have the cooperative rulebook AND the main rulebook (remember: this is an EXPANSION so it has its own set of rules) out at the same time to push through the game.

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Need to have BOTH rulebooks open to play! The original rulebook from base Thunderstone Quest (on top) and the new rulebook for the Barricades on the bottom!

It’s been like this for every playthrough TQBE!   Really, a player summary card would have gone a loooooong way towards making this easier ….

Gameplay

HOT doesn’t have too many rules.  You just start playing right away.

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In TQBE, you keep forgetting rules and have to look stuff up:

  • “Oh ya, bread can be used for skill too?”
  • “Why do we want to use the Marketplace?  Draw a card from the marketplace or deck?” (We never did figure it from the rules, but it seemed too powerful to just take a card from the marketplace, so we assume it meant draw an extra card on your turn)
  • “Wait, when do we get the frozen wounds?  What’s a festering wound?”

We had to look up many rules for TQBE expansion, and we realized (even after a number of plays) that we are still learning things!

Comparison

Here’s the thing: Heroes of Tenefyr wasn’t for us.  I played HOT solo to learn the game, and I never felt like I had any real choices.  Sure, I could cull a card from time to time, but you always cull your zeroes!  Not really a choice.   It felt like you just turned over cards and saw what happened.  I was hoping the group play would be better (and it was) but my gaming group hated this game.  They said the same thing I did, “It felt like I had no choices, I just turned cards over.”    I liked it better than that with more people, but it felt almost like cooperative war (the card game) … which could be fun with the right group.  Fun and brainless, nice art, but not really a lot of choices.  I liked it okay in the end, but my gaming group rated it very low: 5ish–one person gave it a 2!

I wanted to talk about Heroes of Tenefyr first so I could talk about Thunderstone Quest: The Barricades Expansion.    They really are polar opposites.

HOT is easy to set-up and explain, but has few choices when playing.  But it’s short, maybe under an hour.

TQBE is hard to set-up and explain, but you have SO MANY choices when playing!  And it’s long: maybe 2 hours?

Conclusion

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In the end, my group loved TQBE because it has a lot of choices!  It’s just the nature of my game group: your mileage may vary.  We ended up giving TQBE probably a 7 or 8 overall, but we realized we had to “suffer” for our choices.   Set-up and tear-down were long, the rulebooks were a bit daunting (they were well written, but the cooperative mode was separate so it made it messy to go back and forth). At times, the game felt like “work” trying to juggle everything going on.  But it was fun!

In the end, the solo mode was good but 2-3 players was probably the sweet spot. 4 players works.  5 players may be a bit too much for this game…  I mean it works,  but there is so much going on, it becomes a little overwhelming.

Be aware: it’ll probably take 3 hours from start to finish to get through as game (because set-up and tear-down adds another hour over the 2 hour gameplay), but it was a fun game with a lot of choices.

Maybe Heroes of Tenefyr is for you and your game group or maybe Thunderstone Quest: The Barricades Expansion is for you and your game group.  Based on my experience, you are going to like one and dislike the the other.

 

Top 10 Cooperative SuperHero Board and Card Games

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I’ve been reading Comic Books since I was very young (7? 10?  years old?)  and SuperHero comics were always my favorite.  I wanted to be Batman (with cool gadgets) or Superman (with his flying and heat vision) or Spiderman (flinging webs) or Quasar (who? Read The Pegasus Project) or pretty much ANY SuperHero.   When I first discovered cooperative board games (like Arkham Horror, 2nd Edition) in the early 2000s, I was excited but disappointed!  Why weren’t there any cooperative SuperHero games?  There just weren’t any …

Fast-forward to 2019!  The Avengers: Endgame movie just came out and is one of the biggest movies of the year!  If not the decade!  SuperHeroes are definitely in vogue, and there are a bunch of SuperHero games now!  And a good number of them are cooperative games.  Let’s take a look at the Top 10 Cooperative SuperHero games!

Preamble

Before we get into the list, let’s talk about a few that didn’t quite make it for one reason or another.

  • Justice League Hero Dice (Flash or Batman or Superman or Green Lantern set): This game is really hard to get a hold of.  I “happened” to just find the Flash version at my local game store!  But, this game is out of print and so very hard to find in the US for any reasonable price.  I did get a German version of the Batman version though (for too much money).  The dice are pretty awesome, and there are some great ideas in here, but it’s too hard to get, and the gameplay is perhaps a little too simple.  I think if this game had been better supported, it might have inspired some expansions which would have made the game better.  The components were just dice and cards, but they were pretty awesome quality. I just wish the game were better.
  • Heroes Wanted: (with Champions and Masterminds I or II): The base game of Heroes Wanted is NOT a cooperative game.  It’s a quirky and silly game of building silly SuperHeroes with different parts (almost like paper dolls) and getting victory points.  They came out with two cooperative expansions (Champions and Masterminds) … and they were just okay.   They replaced all the funny, quirky SuperHeroes with just 4 Heroes that you HAD to play with.    Part of the fun was just the silliness, and it felt like the game was stripped of a lot of its core mechanisms to make it cooperative.  I really wanted to like the cooperative versions a lot more, but it’s just okay.  The competitive version is better.

Okay! Let’s get to the Top 10!  As usual, we will  quickly discuss whether the game plays solo (Does it follow Saunders’ Law?)

10. DC Deckbuilding game with the Crisis expansion(s)!

Plays Solo?  If you play two decks.

By default, the original DC Deckbuilding game is a competitive deck-building game.  As of now, there are 4 Crisis packs (see picture above) that turn the game into a cooperative game.  It’s still, at its core, a deck-building game.  It adds cooperative mechanics as each player takes the role of a SuperHero from the DC Universe (with fairly simple powers) and players try, as a group, to work their way through a set number of crises.  If the players make it through the last one before the deck runs out, they win! The mechanics are a little clumsy and the “crises” feel a little pasted on into the deck-building game, but in the end, it was pretty fun.

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As of this writing, they are “rebooting” the game. The deck-building engine of the DC Deckbuilding game is called the Cerberus engine, and apparently has evolved through quite a number of products, including Attack on Titan.  The new Rebirth is supposed to add some legacy elements, add movement around the city, and is the “best” version of the Cerberus engine!  Time will tell if it’s significantly better!  You KNOW we’ll review it here on CO-OP Gestalt!

9: Batman: The Animated Series – Gotham City Under Siege

Plays Solo?  If you play multiple characters.

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This is a real fun dice-chucker by Richard Lanius (designer of Arkham Horror 2nd Edition!) and Michael Guigliano.  Each player takes the role of a Hero from the Batman (the Animated Series) universe: Batman, Robin, Commissioner Gordon, etc.    You are trying to stop the Villains from blowing up the buildings!  Working together, you role dice, mitigate dice rolls, and move/position your Hero around the city to stop exploding buildings!

The game has a real high “toy factor” with the little minis and the buildings you can move to.  It’s a fun, it a little lucky (with so much dice-chucking)!

8: Thanos Rising: Avengers Infinity War

Plays Solo? No, unless you play multiple leaders (but then it’s clumsy).

So, this is another dice-chucker (like the Batman game at number 8).  Each player takes he role of a hero who is a team leader (become Captain America for the Avengers team or Gamora for the Guardians of the Galaxy team or …).   The players role dice to try to recruit characters for your team, with the ultimate goal of collaborating and defeating Thanos (using the same dice you are using to recruit)!

Like Batman, this one also had a nice “toy factor”, with a Thanos figure who rotates and “attacks” 1 of 3 sectors per turn.  As the game proceeds, Thanos progresses and finds more and more Infinity Stones (gaining more powers for each gem he acquires), until he finds them all and wins!  You have to stop him!

This game is a dice-chucker and arguably more lucky than the Batman game, but I still had fun!  Even when I was rolling bad, I was rooting for my friends who were rolling MUCH better than me!  Fun cooperative game.

7. 5-Minute Marvel

Plays Solo?  No.  This game is really about the interaction with multiple players. You could probably technically play two different characters.

This game is by far the lightest game on this list, but it was so easy to play and so easy to get into!   Each player takes the role of some Hero (each with a different, simple power to manipulate cards).

You all work together to draw cards and try to get all the cards you need to defeat the all the bad guys.  It’s all real-time!  You play cards, take out villains until you finally get to the big bad! But you only have 5 minutes!  If you run out of time, you lose!

The game is slightly misnamed, as you have 5 minutes PER VILLAIN!  You start off with a simple villain, try to beat him in 5 minutes!  Then repeat, with harder and harder Villains until you get to Thanos!  If you take out Thanos, you win!

This is a very light game, but really fun!  And the cooperation REALLY comes through in this one, as you have to share cards in real-time.

6. Oblivaeon!

Solo Play?  Inasmuch as Sentinels is: see this blog post for how to play solo.

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Soooo … this is by far the heaviest game on this list.  This is the “final” expansion for Sentinels of the Multiverse (a cooperative SuperHero game), but it is a very different game in many ways!  It adds so many new mechanics, it is no longer the simple, straight-forward card game but a deep, deep game!

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Oblivaeon: starting set-up! It’s huge!

The players work together together to take down Oblivaeon (who looks NOTHING LIKE THANOS) as he and his forces shift between realities, and heroes die (!) forcing the players to on the role of new players (who will also die).    Players have to go in knowing that your hero will die, because it might be too much to handle in the heat of the game!

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This is real fun, but do not attempt it unless you are ready for a 3-4 hour game which is not unlike Avengers: Endgame!

5. Kick-Ass: The Board Game

Solo Play? Yes.  Really good solo!

This one really surprised me.  I don’t like this comic series.  But the game is really great.   It’s probably the second heaviest game on this list.

Each player takes on the role of a character from the Comic Book.  Their powers are set by some starting cards, which are VERY DIFFERENT for each character.  Players move around the city, keeping crime under control.  They are trying to find the “Big Bad” Villain to fight at the end of the game.  The players have to keep the events (upper part of the board) in check, otherwise the city just gets overridden with crime.

The game has a 18+ rating, as there is some language and imagery that is mature.  That’s consistent with the comic and movie.

But this game is really good!  You feel like you “level up” as you play the game, so you feel like your character is getting better and better as you play!  You become better at Social Media (seriously), hit the gym, buy better equipment, cheer yourself up.  There’s even a smidge of deck-building (your main action cards, but you can only ever have 5 cards)!  But you still work with your compatriots to fight crime, keep the city under control, keep the events under control, all while leveling-up so you can fight the Big Bad at the end of the game.

I really liked this game.

4. Legendary: A Marvel Deck-Building Game

Solo play: Yes.  You can play 2 hands, but there are multiple rules for solo play on BGG.

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Legendary is a Marvel-themed cooperative deck-builder.  In this game, you don’t play a particular hero, but you play more like a “manager” as you recruit Heroes to your deck, all while trying to stop villains from moving across the city and escaping!

The game has TONS of expansions and tons of different scenarios in this simple deck-building system.   It feels good to build up your deck and get better and better heroes and take out the Villains as they escape from the Villain Deck.

Strictly speaking, this is NOT a cooperative game, as you are supposed to add up the victory points (of all bad guys you defeated)  and the winner is the one with the most victory points.  We NEVER play like this: we always play purely cooperative, and everybody I know plays it cooperative.  I wish they would just make it official!

3. The Reckoners

Solo play? Yes!

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The Rulebook for The Reckoners

By all measures, this game shouldn’t be this high on the list!  At the end of the day, the core mechanic is “really” just a Yahtzee “reroll dice up to 3 times”!

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The dice: this is really just a Yahtzee game, but the dice are SO nice!

The game has amazing components, and these components really bring out the theme of the game!  The city locations are these amazing dice trays!

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Game Setup from Rulebook

The game has Player Selected Turn Order, (one of my favorite game mechanics), as you can activate your dice in whatever order you like after rolling.

The game feels complicated the very first time you play, but once you get into it, it flows quickly.  Players MUST work together to decide how to help each other.  Do we take out a villain at a location?  Do we do some damage to Steelheart (the big bad you have to defeat to win)?  Do we have to clean up the streets?  Do we go shopping for better gear?

The game is real fun and the component quality is just amazing.

2. Sidekick Saga

Plays Solo?  Yes.  The solo player plays two characters.

Sidekick Saga is Seven Wonders meets Sentinels of the Multiverse meets Pandemic Legacy!  Like Pandemic Legacy, Sidekick Saga has an ongoing story that unfolds over many plays.  Like Seven Wonders, Sidekick Saga has Simultaneous Action Selection, so everyone can play at once (keeping the game moving quickly).  Like Sentinels, each player plays a SuperHero character with very different powers (and these powers can upgrade and change as the game evolves!)

At the end of the day, Sidekick Saga has an ongoing story, city exploration, fast-moving play, great art, and probably my favorite feature: you can make your own Super Heroes!

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1. Sentinels of the Multiverse

Plays Solo?  You can, but it’s not built-in to the game:  See this blog entry for how to play solo

sotm

This is not really a surprise to anyone who knows me.  I bought the game sight unseen off the Greater Than Game website in 2011 (I have the original version with the original art above!)  I knew nothing about the game.  After I played it, I never looked back … I loved it!

Each player takes the role of a Superhero with their own deck!  Each SuperHero is VERY different and plays VERY differently!  Of all the games on this list, this is the one where you really feel like you are playing that hero and nothing else is like you!

The gameplay is simple: play a card, use a power, draw a card.  That’s it!  (Well, you have to draw a card for the environment and the Bad Guy too ..)  What makes the game interesting is what the cards do!

There are SO MANY expansions to the game and so much content, you could play this game for years!  It also has the best App of any game I have played (if only because you can rewind a turn or two!)

Some  people think this game is too fiddly (in which case, the app is definitely for you), but it seems to bring out the SuperHero genre better than any game I have played!  Even when you lose, it reminds me of old Spiderman comics (“I lost to the the magic guy!  Maybe I’ll go recruit Doctor Strange to help me!”) where you rethink how you go after a Villain NEXT TIME!

Sentinels make me feel like I am playing a SuperHero.